English Arabic Chinese (Traditional) French German Italian Japanese Portuguese Russian Spanish Swedish
"When I got my Wimbledon win I had to open the dance at the gala night. I'd rather serve three double faults in a row than do such a thing again." - Stefan Edberg about what he hates the most doing. Read the article

General news

Stefan Edberg, last winner on grass


Stefan Edberg and Mats Wilander just after their handshake in the 1985 Australian Open final

from La Gazette du Tennis
by Stephane
translated into English by Mauro Cappiello

The Australian Open (named Australian Championships until 1969) is now the first and less "prestigious" Grand Slam tournament of the season (before the French Open at Roland Garros, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open). This is explained by its history.

In the 1920s, the influence of American Tennis in Europe, played by the great William "Bill" Tilden, met with the arrival of our Musketeers. Indeed, the World clay court Championships (Saint-Cloud) were transferred to the Stade Roland Garros, which was originally built for Brugnon, Borotra, Cochet and Lacoste to defend the Davis Cup taken from the hands of the masters on American soil in 1926. At that time, tennis was played from spring to autumn, with the sequence Roland Garros-Wimbledon as the highlight of the season. This ending was traditionally the Davis Cup final.

What is the Australian Open? Europeans did not play in the winter (at the time they summed up tennis and other occupations): therefore it was impossible to ship for 45 days to play a simple tennis tournament.

So it was a shunned tournament, even with the advent of the Open era: finals between Australians... The best players of the 1970s, Borg, Nastase, Orantes took part only once.

 

Merry Christmas from... Stefan Edberg :-)

At the end of this very important, wonderful year for our site, we want to give our best wishes of Merry Christmas to all our visitors, fans and followers, who help our project grow every day, with this funny video of Stefan Edberg and Annette Olsen dressed up like elves and dancing "Jingle Bells".Video made through the Elfyourself application » http://host-d.oddcast.com/elfyourself2012/home.php

Send Stefan and Annette your Christmas message through the site and Facebook comments!

 

Celebrities queued in Södra Climate Arena

from Smp.se
by Sven Elofsson
translated into English by Mauro Cappiello

Yesterday the new Södra Climate Arena was filled with tennis stars from the Swedish greatness.

Former Davis Cup players Niklas Kulti and Mikael Tillström from Good to Great academy led exercises on one of the courts, Magnus Larsson and Stefan Edberg played on another, and former national team captain Carl-Axel Hageskog strolled mostly around with a smile.

The medical technology company Bactiguard has gone in with millions to support Swedish youth tennis and was the evening's host. The company, with Billy Södervall as the "inventor", has picked five talents for its future team.

 

From golden age to disaster

from Eurosport.fr
by Laurent Vergne
Translated into English by Mauro Cappiello
Read the original article in French

From the French version of Eurosport.com, an in-depth analysis on the persistant crisis of Swedish tennis that, with Robin Söderling's long absence, is becoming more and more evident. Twenty-five Grand Slam titles in the Open Era, no player in the top-300 now...

On the path of Björn Borg, the man who started it all, Swedish tennis has experienced a golden age in the '80s. Before a slow but irreversible decline. Whether the Davis Cup, the Grand Slam or ATP, the contrast between the golden age and the current period is striking.

 

Enqvist, 38, Sweden's top player

from Svd.se
by Jonas Arnesen


Could Thomas Enqvist still be the hardest Swede to beat in 2012?

Who is Sweden's best tennis player now? According to the ranking, the answer is Patrik Rosenholm. But I say Thomas Enqvist, the 38-year-old Davis Cup captain who played his last ATP tournament seven years ago.

Some national success is unlikely at the 44th edition of the Stockholm Open, which begins on Monday at the Kungliga Tennishallen. On the other hand, Swedish tennis is in such a deep slump that many of the long-time retired stars would fare very well in the home competition after aboout a month of hard training.

This is of course impossible to prove, nevertheless the fact that Enqvist is a player of a higher level than Rosenholm and the 28 other Swedes who have a place on the ranking list is something that can be substantiated with hard facts.

 
More Articles...