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"There are little things. Technically Roger is strong. It's more about how he moves on the court, how he hits the ball. And I think it would also be good if he would vary his game a bit more than he does at the moment" - Stefan Edberg about what Roger Federer could improve in his game. Read the interview

General news

Edberg, the trees and the neighbors

from L'Équipe
by Pierre-Étienne Minonzio 
translated into English by Mauro Cappiello

Roger Federer's coach took sides in a dispute opposing a tennis and a golf club in the region of Var. With former rugby player Jean-Pierre Rives supporting him.


Stefan Edberg with his former sparring partner Arnaud Deleval in a picture taken in recent years

The town of Grimaud extends between the green hills and the shores of the Mediterranean. In this enchanting context of Var, near Saint-Tropez, an amazing conflict between a golf and a tennis club is taking place, worthy of an episode of the M6 tv show "One does not choose their neighbors." But a very particular episode, involving sports celebrities...

Background: on March 9th, Arnaud Deleval, a founder of SALB, the company that manages the Grimaud tennis club, was surprised by arriving at his club, to see a crane cutting down half a dozen trees next to a court. "I called a bailiff, but by the time he had arrived, all the trees had been cut," he says. "It's amazing, they made it without telling me anything, as if they were at home."

"They" is the direction of the golf course nearby, which, according to Deleval, was not allowed to order this slaughter. The event, indeed, occurred on a small part of the golf club belonging to SALB, owner of 2 of the 36 hectares that make up the course (you follow?).

 

Sampras: "Loss to Edberg was my turning point"

by Mauro Cappiello


Stefan Edberg and Pete Sampras during the 1992 US Open final ceremony

In an exclusive interview released by Linus Sunnervik for Expressen.se, Pete Sampras recalled the 1992 US Open final he lost to Stefan Edberg as a turning point in his career.

The American legend, who is playing the Kings of Tennis Champions event in Stockholm, lost that match at the end of a four set battle, but gradually faded away after the third set tie-break, maybe also due to weakness for a stomach ache that had affected him during the semifinal against Jim Courier.

"None of us played really well, but he won with his experience," admitted Pete. "I remember I slowly lost the will during the match. I didn't fight. I was somehow satisfied to just be in the final. And it gnawed at me for months."

 

Stefan Edberg and the $100 trick

by Mauro Cappiello

Playing a doubles match with or against Stefan Edberg would be a dream fulfilled not only for any STE...fan, but virtually for any tennis fan. International supercar driver Steve Goldfield was lucky enough to turn this dream into reality, as documented by a video he himself posted on his Youtube channel last August.

Although the clip description says the match was played "a couple of years ago", the location and Stefan's outfit seem to suggest images date back to 2003, when Adidas organized a tennis camp in Scottsdale, Arizona.

As a long-time Adidas testimonial, along with Megan Shaughnessy and Martina Hingis, Edberg was a special guest of the event, that offered wealthy amateurs the chance to meet legends and play with them.

Nothing special about it, but the video is funny because it provides evidence of an episode wonderfully described by Richard Pagliaro in an article on the Adidas Fantasy Camp written back at the time for Tennis Week.

 

Arvidsson seeks motivations at Edberg's Academy

from Sveriges Radio
translated into English by Mauro Cappiello

She has been the Swedish tennis number one for many years. After a difficult season Sofia Arvidsson started practicing and studying in Växjö - and now hopes for new success.

- I have been in the game for a long time and needed a new start and so I took this chance, says Sofia Arvidsson, who is one of Sweden's best tennis players.

 

Pat Cash: "The Swedes made my life hard"

from Sport Expressen
by Linus Sunnervik
translated into English by Mauro Cappiello

Tennis Legend Pat Cash is always associated with Swedish successes and falls. For Sport Expressen the Australian tells about his fascination for the Swedish tennis miracle, his criticism of Roger Federer and his own tennis federation and how he hated to face the Swedes. - They always made my life a pain, says Cash.

Sweden's tennis dominance in the 1980s has become famous as the Swedish tennis miracle. With Stefan Edberg, Mats Wilander, Anders Järryd and Joakim Nystrom the Vikings salvaged three Davis Cup wins. However, Sweden also collected two finals losses, in 1983 and 1986. Both times Sweden fell against Australia in a fifth and decisive match. Both times it was Pat Cash on the other side of the net.

"The Swedes were a problem"
The now 49-year-old Australian has not forgotten. But he remembers the Swedes as much for his two final losses at home at the Australian Open in 1987 against Stefan Edberg and in 1988 against Mats Wilander.

Cash now lives in London and works regularly for CNN. For the channel he has produced a documentary about the Swedish tennis miracle.

 
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