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"It's a special award and an honor for me. But I say to myself that I'm just too young to have that prize named after me. But I think in just a few years time the prize will be renamed after Roger Federer, because he's already got it so many times..." - Stefan Edberg on the Sportsmanship Award. Read the interview

Fedberg

Roger has never played this well, Wilander says

from L'Équipe
by Mats Wilander
translated into English by Mauro Cappiello

In his analysis for L'Équipe this morning, Mats Wilander wrote about the transformations in Roger Federer's game style after the start of his partnership with Stefan Edberg that allowed him to get back to his top and take, at the age of 33, his first Davis Cup title.

Yesterday, Roger Federer was amazing. It's hard to say that he is a better player than between 2004 and 2007 because he is thirty-three. But in terms of technical options and tactical understanding, he never played tennis this well.

He always plays the right shot at the right time. He goes to the net exactly when he needs it, he plays drop shots with the perfect timing during the rally, etc. You can feel a systematic will to move forward and not to be dragged into a long exchange.

 

Federer's bad luck reminds of Edberg's 1996 DC final

by Mauro Cappiello

Roger Federer lost his first match in a Davis Cup final in straight sets against Gael Monfils. The Swiss was clearly struggling on court, limited by the back injury he suffered in his ATP World Tour Finals semifinal against team mate Stan Wawrinka.

Today's images brought many to compare Federer's bad luck to the one happened to his coach Stefan Edberg in 1996, when he played his last official match in the Davis Cup final in Malmö right against France. Serving on 2-3 in the first set of the opening rubber, Stefan twisted his right ankle at the net.

He took a long injury time-out and had his foot treated and taped, but that wasn't enough to allow him to get back to the court at his top. He lost that match in straight sets, too, and was unable to compete again in the following two days of the final, that Sweden eventually lost in a dramatic decisive match.

 

Edberg: "Federer has got more Major titles in him"

from AS.com
by Alejandro Delmás 
translated into English by Mauro Cappiello

Stefan Edberg was the coach behind Federer's renaissance. If the back injury allows him, he can complete his record of trophies with a Davis Cup title.

When the relationship between you and Roger began, almost a year ago, did you expect these results?

For me, almost everything was a surprise from the first call I received from Roger, yes, almost exactly one year ago. During the first few months I tried to get used to the idea that I was his coach or technical advisor, in the sense that I became part of his team. We had to find the right feeling. During practice, Federer has also surprised me with the amount of things that he can assimilate and execute. He can actually grasp and do anything you say.

Have you been able to develop the technical ideas that you had since the beginning of this 2014 season?

Yes I had a clear idea that he could no longer try to win matches from the baseline. He had to attack more. We started from the basis that he has all the potential shots for an offensive game: his shots are actually perfect. We changed his mentality in some aspects of the game and then he even changed his racquet. We get along quite well. So we just had to expect these results that have arrived.

 

Federer and Djokovic to meet in WTF final

Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic reached the final at the ATP World Tour Finals in London, both winning in three sets against Stan Wawrinka and Kei Nishikori.

It will be a re-match of the Wimbledon final (today at 6.00 pm, London time) and another act of the classic rivalry between super coaches Stefan Edberg and Boris Becker, who played their only final against each other at the Masters in New York 25 years ago.

After the Serb had dominated Nishikori in the afternoon semifinal, losing his first set of the tournament mainly due to a drop of concentration, Federer managed to escape defeat in the all Swiss semifinal against Wawrinka, saving four match points in what has been by far the most thrilling and technically enjoyable match of the event.

In the video below, you can relive the four match points saved by the world number two and the one that gave him the chance to play his ninth final (chasing his seventh title) at the year-end Championship. With Stefan Edberg's final standing ovation. (mc)

 

Edberg: Federer 'the best I've seen all year by far'


After Roger Federer's last Round Robin match at the ATP World Tour Finals in London, a 6-0 6-1 demolition of local favourite Andy Murray, Stefan Edberg was interviewed by BBC's broadcast Sunday's 5 live sport.

The Swede talked about his pupil's performance that he described as "the best tennis he has seen all year by far". "I don't think he can play much better than that, to be honest. He's playing some of his best tennis after the US Open and, if he can maintain what he has at the moment, he has got a big chance for next year as well".

Hear the complete interview below.

 
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